Stoll Revisited, Why Transhumanism Is Still Utopian

And why technological progress alone does not lead to a better life

by Diego Ramiro Lattes

Technological reactionaries and progressives

Some people have always had a hatred of all things new, romanticizing a “glorious past” and often ignoring that the changes since those times have not been entirely for the worst. We can argue from dawn to dusk then back to dawn all about how there is still inequality and economic injustice in the technological world – but just as much could be said about the pre-technological era of kings and emperors. Yet these people blame progress for social decay, how technology has disconnected people from “the land” and its supposed virtues – that urban society is worse than the glorified agricultural realms of old. Continue reading “Stoll Revisited, Why Transhumanism Is Still Utopian”

Neoliberalism 4: Waiting For Thatcher

by Mike Goodman

In the beginning . . .

This installment begins with the 1947 conference and The Mont Pelerin Society’s inauguration completed (see “Neoliberalism 3” in this series), with agreement made that it be a think tank and have a duty to promote intellectual promotion of the ideas of freedom. One key point to bear in mind is that all participants were unanimously against the ideas of Keynes and against Communism, as well as any form of collective government. Continue reading “Neoliberalism 4: Waiting For Thatcher”

Neoliberalism 2: From Paris to Pèlerin

by Mike Goodman

Errata

Before continuing on this journey it is appropriate to correct two errors in the introductory text last week.

The first is that the word Neoliberalism was adopted during the “Colloque Walter Lippmann” (the Walter Lippmann Colloquium) which took place in 1938, predating the Mont Pèlerin meeting it was accredited to last week by almost 9 years. Continue reading “Neoliberalism 2: From Paris to Pèlerin”

Neoliberalism 1: What Is It? Where Did It Come From? A Force For Good Or For Evil?

The first article in what will be a lengthy series examining the creation, formulation, expansion and wide acceptance of the Neoliberal doctrine of political philosophy. The series will go on to analyse how it has informed political and economic activity since its take up by the Reagan and Thatcher administrations in the USA and UK respectively.

by Mike Goodman

The term neoliberalism is being bandied around on social media and people are labelled with the handle neoliberal as though the words were synonymous with rock and roll teenagers’ slang in the early 1960s. Does anybody (apart from me) remember “77 Sunset Strip” and the “hip” language of its somewhat larger than life hero? Continue reading “Neoliberalism 1: What Is It? Where Did It Come From? A Force For Good Or For Evil?”

Does Stimulus Spending Work?

The Case against Ricardian Equivalence

by Joe Blackwell

Today the use of fiscal policy (expanding government spending or reducing taxes) to stimulate GDP growth in times of recession has become one of the most controversial policy areas of modern macroeconomics. For those who favour free market based solutions, commonly known as neoliberals, interventionist fiscal policy is inherently wasteful and distorts the processes of the market system. On the other side of the debate are the various groups of Keynesians who see fiscal policy as a crucial stabilisation tool to prevent the economy entering a deep and prolonged recession. Continue reading “Does Stimulus Spending Work?”