Monetary Policy Doesn’t Drive the Economy

by Derek McDaniel

To manage a currency, there are two primary tools: fiscal policy and monetary policy. Fiscal policy is all the spending done by the political authority (The Treasury), while monetary policy (setting the price for borrowing liquidity) is conducted by a so-called independent body (The Central Bank). Continue reading “Monetary Policy Doesn’t Drive the Economy”

Neoliberalism 4: Waiting For Thatcher

by Mike Goodman

In the beginning . . .

This installment begins with the 1947 conference and The Mont Pelerin Society’s inauguration completed (see “Neoliberalism 3” in this series), with agreement made that it be a think tank and have a duty to promote intellectual promotion of the ideas of freedom. One key point to bear in mind is that all participants were unanimously against the ideas of Keynes and against Communism, as well as any form of collective government. Continue reading “Neoliberalism 4: Waiting For Thatcher”

MGTOW and Matriarchy

by Serban V.C. Enache

MGTOW (Men Going Their Own Way) is an online community which perceives the legal and romantic entanglements with women as being detrimental to men in net terms (cost/benefit analysis). In my opinion, they have every reason to be wary of the current (patriarchal) marriage and alimony laws, since they were written for a time in which women didn’t have access to paid work or education. The laws are incompatible with contemporary society and should be reformed. Continue reading “MGTOW and Matriarchy”

Thomas Edison and Henry Ford explain Modern Monetary Theory in 1921

Edison and Ford were Deficit Owls

by Serban V.C. Enache

In December 1921, Henry Ford and Thomas Edison visited the Muscle Shoals nitrate and water power projects near Florence, Alabama. Thomas Edison gave an interview with the The New York Times, “Ford Sees Wealth In Muscle Shoals.” With fair use, and in the interest of posterity and public purpose, I reproduce Edison’s views on finance and the economy – which are 100 percent consistent with Modern Monetary Theory. Continue reading “Thomas Edison and Henry Ford explain Modern Monetary Theory in 1921”

Say “Welcome To Recession,” Great Britain

by Mike Goodman

We’re Not In Recession!

Not officially. But we soon will be. The government are congratulating themselves on reaching a so-called budget surplus for the last quarter (October to December) of 2017, which was the third quarter of the fiscal year just ended. They have done this, regardless of the state of the economy, as a deliberate policy target since that was first set by George Osborne. Continue reading “Say “Welcome To Recession,” Great Britain”